Episode #22 Wearing Gay History with Eric Gonzaba

eric 1Greetings all! This week we talk with George Mason University Ph.D. candidate Eric Gonzaba about his work with two absolutely fascinating digital archives: Wearing Gay History and the Rainbow History Project. If there has ever been a great case for exploring how textiles and other material culture can help us understand currents of history, this is it. We also get into Eric’s research on African American and Queer nightlife in the latter third of the 20th century. Great stuff…and I hope to welcome Eric back to the show soon.

We discuss:

  • The creation and continued growth of Wearing Gay History
  • LGBT communities and textiles
  • Diversity within communities
  • Digital history
  • His research project: Because the Night: Nightlife and Remaking the Gay Male World, 1970-2000

Eric has some really excellent advice for history students (which I follow myself) and suggests we all go right out and read In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (that’s the second nomination for Capote this month…) and The Ways of White Folks by Langston Hughes. You’ll also want to check out Eric’s other project, the Trump Protest Archive, and shoot him a Tweet!

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Disclosure: Books and products on this blog are hyperlinked to my Amazon affiliate code. Any purchase will not cost you a cent extra but will support the show by shaking loose some coin from the Internet money tree. Now, don’t you feel better for helping keep this show alive? Of course you do…because you are a wonderful person.

Music by Advent Chamber Orchestra is licensed under Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/

Episode #21 Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority with Ellen Wu

ellen-photoI had so much fun talking with Ellen about this really fascinating topic. She fills me in on all kinds of things – the details of how Asians went from being reviled in the United States to emerging as the “model minority” post-WWII. Chinese exclusion? Japanese internment? Yup, we talk about all these things…so how is it, then, after decades of existing on the margins, did Asian Americans carve out their so-called “model” status? Welp, I guess you will have to listen to find out (hint: it’s a Cold War story).

We discuss:

  • Documentary evidence when studying Asian Americans in both the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Common experiences of Asian immigrants from different countries
  • The distinctions between Chinese Americans and Japanese Americans in the late 19th and mid-20th centuries
  • Post WWII immigration of Koreans, Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Laotians
  • The “Melting Pot of the Pacific”
  • Chinatown(s) as a curiosity

Ellen also has some great recommendations, advice for students, and we discuss an excellent book, most certainly worthy of your attention: To Save the Children of Korea: The Cold War Story of International Adoption by Arissa H. Oh. You can find Ellen on Twitter…so give her a follow and say hi 🙂

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Disclosure: Books and products on this blog are hyperlinked to my Amazon affiliate code. Any purchase will not cost you a cent extra but will support the show by shaking loose some coin from the Internet money tree. Now, don’t you feel better for helping keep this show alive? Of course you do…because you are a wonderful person.

Music by Advent Chamber Orchestra is licensed under Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/

Episode #20 Art as Iconoclast with Dara Vance

 

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Greetings citizens!! I am thrilled to have Dara on the show – she is a Ph.D. Candidate in history at the University of Kentucky, former producer of the Long Story Short podcast, and a really really talented artist. We have some fun discussing the way Dara’s most recent art project dovetails with her work as a historian – and how it is the result of interactions with other historians on social media…challenging ideas of gender and diversity. We touch on some pretty non-traditional ideas about history and how we can present it in the classroom, AND get to why historians should analyze the significance of design elements in their primary sources. Good stuff! And really outside the box. So listen up.

We discuss:

  • A different approach to an advanced degree
  • The Sunshine State
  • Art challenging ideas of gender and diversity
  • Social Media (ummm…Twitter, especially) and scholarly interactions
  • Teaching historians how to analyze visuals IN primary sources

So check it y’all. Dara has some really great advice for history students at all levels of education…for real – words of wisdom. AND suggests we all go have a look at Oh Brother, Where Art Thou – the Cohen Brothers’ masterpiece. Finally, she offers three books that should be read in sequence, to get a feel for “southernness”, as it were: Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, and Timothy Tyson’s Blood Done Sign my Name. So you had better get to it. And…scroll down to check out some of Dara’s most recent digital work – and ponder the ideas we discuss on the show. And remember, be sure to follow Dara on Twitter and check out her blog Florida Superlative.

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Disclosure: Books and products on this blog are hyperlinked to my Amazon affiliate code. Any purchase will not cost you a cent extra but will support the show by shaking loose some coin from the Internet money tree. Now, don’t you feel better for helping keep this show alive? Of course you do…because you are a wonderful person.

Music by Advent Chamber Orchestra is licensed under Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/

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